Events

Sponsored Presentations
2020-2021 event Series
CDUHR Visiting Scholar Series – Dustin Duncan – June 10, 2021
Thursday, June 10, 2021, 10:00 am-11:00 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Dustin T. Duncan, ScD
Presentation title: The Ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic: Impact Among Populations at the Intersection of Race, Sexuality and Gender

The 2019 COVID pandemic (hereafter COVID-19) has become and remains a major acute global public health threat. At the time of this writing, 500,000 deaths due to COVID-19 have been recorded in the United States (U.S.) alone, along with over 28 million cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. However, the pandemic has differentially impacted structurally marginalized populations in scope and magnitude. For example, the mortality rate for Black Americans is 2.3 times that of their White American counterparts. This presentation will describe and explain the COVID-19 pandemic through the lens of social epidemiology, investigating one-by-one the social and structural factors that determine how COVID-19 differentially impacts various communities, with a focus on the impact among populations at the intersection of race, sexuality and gender. In doing so, this presentation will overview Columbia Spatial Epidemiology Lab’s N2 and TURNNT studies, focused on Black sexual minority men and transgender women of color.


Dustin DuncanDustin T. Duncan, ScD (he/him) is a social and spatial epidemiologist, studying how neighborhood characteristics influence population health and health disparities. Dr. Duncan’s intersectional research focuses on Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men (SMM) and transgender women of color. His research has a strong domestic focus–including in New York City and the Deep South–and his recent work spans the globe such as in West Africa, especially with Columbia’s International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP). In addition to HIV epidemiology and sleep epidemiology, his current interests include characterizing the COVID-19 epidemic in the United States and globally, especially among marginalized populations. Notably, his group recently completed the N2 COVID Study, where they surveyed 226 Black SMM and Black transgender women in Chicago on various aspects of COVID-19 from April to July 2020. Methodologically, his research utilizes a geospatial lens to apply advanced geographic information systems, web-based and real-time geospatial technologies, and geospatial modeling techniques. Working in collaborations with scholars across the world, he has over 175 high-impact scientific articles, book chapters, and books and his research has appeared in major media outlets including U.S. News & World Report, The Washington Post, The New York Times and CNN. Dr. Duncan’s work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the HIV Prevention Trials Network, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Verizon Foundation, and the Aetna Foundation. He currently leads two NIH-funded R01 studies, as well as studies funded by other sources, and mentors K and other awards of junior scientists. He has received several early career and distinguished scientific contribution awards including from the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS). In 2020, he received the Mentor of the Year Award from Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Cara Bergo, Mai Tuyet Pho, Marynia Kolak – June 8, 2021
Tuesday, June 8, 2021, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Cara Bergo, PhD; Mai Tuyet Pho, MD, MPH; and Marynia Kolak, MS, MFA, PhD
Presentation title: A Vulnerability Assessment for a Future HIV Outbreak Associated with Injection Drug Use in Illinois, 2017-2018

The current opioid crisis and the increase in injection drug use (IDU) have led to outbreaks of HIV in communities across the country. These outbreaks have prompted country and statewide examination into identifying factors to determine areas at risk of a future HIV outbreak. Based on methodology used in a prior nationwide, county-level analysis by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we examined Illinois at the ZIP code level.  Based on this analysis, Illinois prioritized recommendations to include increasing access to harm reduction services, specifically sterile syringe services, naloxone access, infectious disease screening, and increased linkage to care for hepatitis C and opioid use disorder.


cara-bergoCara Bergo, PhD, recently completed her PhD in epidemiology from the University of Illinois at Chicago. During her work as an intern with the Illinois Department of Public Health, she performed the analysis for the vulnerability assessment in Illinois. She received her MPH in epidemiology from Emory University and her PhD in epidemiology in 2020. Following her MPH, she completed the CSTE Applied Epidemiology Fellowship in 2015 in Louisiana. She completed her PhD in collaboration with the Iowa Department of Public Health focused on severe maternal morbidity in January 2020. She is currently the Maternal Mortality Epidemiologist for the Illinois Department of Public Health, Office of Women’s Health and Family Services.

mai-tuyet-phoMai Tuyet Pho, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago in the Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases and Global Health, as well as the Director for Health Policy Research at the Chicago Center for HIV Elimination. She studies health outcomes and public policy at the intersection of HIV, hepatitis C, and substance use. Current projects includes understanding the shifting epidemiology of hepatitis C and opioid use, harm reduction in rural communities, linkage to care at reentry for criminal-legal involved individuals, and economic evaluation of HCV and HIV screening and treatment strategies. Her work has been funded by NIDA, CDC, and AHRQ. Dr. Pho served as the interim Chief Medical Officer at the Illinois Department of Public Health and is currently a Medical Advisor for Healthcare Policy and Research in the Office of the Director.

marynia-kolakMarynia Kolak, MS, MFA, PhD, is a health geographer and data scientist using open science tools and an exploratory data analytic approach to investigate issues of equity across space and time. Her research centers on how “place” impacts health outcomes in different ways, for different people, from opioid risk environments to chronic disease clusters. She focuses on quantifying and distilling the structural determinants of health across different environments, tying socio-ecological models of public health with geocomputational methods and quasi-experimental policy evaluation techniques. Marynia leads the Healthy Regions & Policies Lab at University of Chicago’s Center for Spatial Data Science, where she also serves as the Assistant Director of Health Informatics and Senior Lecturer. She additionally serves as a Health and Medical Specialty Group board member at the American Association of Geographers, and is chair of the Chicago Public Health GIS Network.

CDUHR Mentoring Core Presentation – UCSF CAPS Panel – May 20, 2021
Thursday, May 20, 2021, 12:00 pm-2:00 pm
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Emily Arnold, PhD; Mallory Johnson, PhD; Torsten Neilands, PhD; Marguerita Lightfoot, PhD
Presentation title: UCSF Center for AIDS Prevention Studies and Division of Prevention Science: Programs and Initiatives to Support Early-Stage Investigators Conducting HIV/AIDS Research

In this panel presentation, CAPS Core members will present on their Visiting Professor Program, Mentoring and Mentors program, anti-racism initiatives, and support for early stage investigators.


UCSF-CAPS-panelEmily Arnold, PhD, is an Associate Professor whose interests lie in intersections of culture and health behavior, as it relates to gender, sexuality, and HIV-related risk behavior. Mallory Johnson, PhD, is Professor-in-Residence and Co-Director of CAPS and Director of the Developmental Core, whose research has focused on understanding, measuring, and improving the health of patients with chronic diseases such as HIV. Torsten Neilands, PhD, is Professor and Director of the Methods Core at CAPS. One of his substantive interests include training the next generation of HIV-prevention prevention researchers working in U.S. minority communities. Marguerita Lightfoot, PhD, is Professor of Medicine at the UCSF School of Medicine, Chief for the Division of Prevention Science, and Director of the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS) and UCSF Prevention Research Center (PRC).

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Patrick S. Sullivan – May 11, 2021
Tuesday, May 11, 2021, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom Webinar
Presented by: Patrick S. Sullivan, PhD
Presentation title: HIV Epidemiology as a Roadmap to HIV Prevention: Inequities, Contexts, and Responses

The epidemiology of the US HIV epidemic tells the story of where we have been, and charts the path for where we need to go to improve health equity.  Through data visualizations, this presentation will highlight the current epidemiology of the US HIV epidemic and link these data to calls for improved surveillance methods and public health actions to address the underlying structural and policy causes for current health inequities in the HIV epidemic.


Patrick SullivanPatrick Sullivan is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Epidemiology at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health, and Co-Director of the Prevention Sciences Core at Emory’s Center for AIDS Research (CFAR).  Before coming to Emory, Patrick worked in at CDC as an EIS officer and serving in HIV Surveillance programs as the Chief of the Behavioral and Clinical Surveillance Branch.  He also served in the HIV Vaccine Trial Networks at the Fred Hutchison Cancer research center.  Dr. Sullivan’s research focuses on HIV among men who have sex with men, including behavioral research, eHealth and mHealth interventions, and surveillance, and he is a member of the HPTN MSM Scientific Committee.  He is Editor in Chief of the Annals of Epidemiology.  His research studies currently involve work in the US South and China.

CDUHR Methods & Mentoring Cores Presentation – Torsten Neilands – April 29, 2021
Thursday, April 29, 2021, 1:00 pm-2:00 pm
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Torsten Neilands, PhD
Presentation title: COVID-19 Pandemic-Related Analysis Challenges: The Duo PACT Study

This presentation will focus on adjustments made to the DUO PACT study due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent interruptions in recruitment, data collection and interviews being conducted remotely. In addition, Dr. Neilands will discuss the strategies for an analytic plan for dealing with missing data, as well as comparing pre-pandemic vs. pandemic differences.


torsten-neilandsTorsten Neilands is a Professor at the UCSF Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS) in the Department of Medicine at UCSF and directs the Center’s Methods Core. Originally trained as a social psychologist, Dr. Neilands has participated as statistical co-investigator or consultant on over 60 NIH, CDC, and state projects in the areas of HIV prevention, reproductive health, and tobacco prevention. His methodological areas of interest are multivariate statistical models with a special interest in latent variable models for survey scale development and validation, and mixed effects (i.e., multilevel; HLM) models for clustered and longitudinal data, including dyadic data. His substantive interests include training the next generation of HIV-prevention prevention researchers working in U.S. minority communities.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Lucas Wiessing – April 13, 2021
Tuesday, April 13, 2021, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom Webinar
Presented by: Lucas Wiessing, PhD
Presentation title: Impact of COVID-19 on Services for People Who Inject Drugs in Sites with Recent HIV Outbreaks in Europe, North America and Israel

Areas with recent HIV outbreaks among people who inject drugs (PWID) may be particularly vulnerable to disruptions in HIV/HCV prevention services. The impact of COVID-19 restrictive measures were assessed on these services at 13 sites in Europe, North America and Israel with recent HIV outbreaks in this population. This presentation will cover the results of an online survey and the innovative ways providers responded to continue essential services.

If time allows, Dr. Wiessing will discuss other work at the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) in Lisbon.


Lucas WiessingLucas Wiessing is a Principal Scientist in public health at the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) in Lisbon. He co-ordinates international studies on drug use and drug related consequences and interventions across the European Union – including on HIV and viral hepatitis in injecting drug users, harm reduction and drug treatment. He is a national from the Netherlands, holds a PhD in public health (with distinction), speaks six languages and plays flute and saxophone semi-professionally. Lucas collaborates and publishes with many relevant organisations and experts in his field, including in key international expert and advisory groups and scientific conferences. Research Gate Profile.

 

CDUHR Methods Presentation – Melody Goodman – March 31, 2021
Wednesday, March 31, 2021, 10:00 am-11:00 am
Location: Zoom Webinar
Presented by: Melody S. Goodman, PhD
Presentation title: The Science of Stakeholder Engagement in Research: Development and Validation of Evaluation Metrics

Stakeholder engagement is a crucial part of participatory public health research, yet the measurement of stakeholder engagement in research is varied, inconsistent, and not methodologically sound. As the level of stakeholder engagement across studies can vary greatly from minimal engagement to fully collaborative partnerships, there is a need for a comprehensively validated quantitative measure of stakeholder engagement in research. We use stakeholder-engaged research approaches and a mixed-methods (qualitative/quantitative) study design to validate a measure to assess the level of stakeholder engagement in research, the research engagement survey tool (REST). Emerging data suggest REST is a valid measure that could potentially assess associations between research outcomes and stakeholder engagement. A 9-item condensed version of REST shows potential to decrease partner burden when measuring stakeholder engagement.


Melody Goodman

Melody Goodman received her BS summa cum laude in applied mathematics-statistics and economics (double major) from Stony Brook University.  She received her MS in biostatistics from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and her PhD from the Department of Biostatistics at Harvard University with minors in theoretical statistics and the social determinants of health disparities. She is the Associate Dean for Research and Associate Professor of Biostatistics, in the School of Global Public Health at New York University.

The National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Verizon Foundation, Long Island Community Foundation, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and Susan G. Komen for the Cure have funded her work.  She has over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and two books (2018 Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group); 1) Public Health Research Methods for Partnerships and Practice and 2) Biostatistics for Clinical and Public Health Research. Dr. Goodman is a biostatistician and research methodologist with a large statistical toolbox. Her research interest is on identifying origins of health disparities and developing, as necessary, evidence-based primary prevention strategies to reduce these health disparities.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Eli Rosenberg – March 9, 2021
Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Eli Rosenberg, PhD
Presentation title: The Intersection of the HIV and COVID-19 Epidemics in New York

In this seminar, Dr. Rosenberg will discuss recent studies conducted by the New York State Department of Health and University of Albany School of Public Health to understand the increased risk of COVID-19 diagnosis, hospitalization, and mortality among persons living with HIV.


 

Eli RosenbergEli Rosenberg is an associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University at Albany School of Public Health. His research centers on applied and analytic epidemiologic studies that address surveillance, prevention, and social determinants of HIV, STI, viral hepatitis, and emerging infectious diseases. Since March 2020, Rosenberg has been providing technical assistance to the State of New York’s COVID-19 response across a range of activities related to understanding SARS-CoV-2 transmission, surveillance, prevention, and treatment.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Michelle Nolan – February 9, 2021
Tuesday, February 9, 2021, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Michelle Nolan, MPH
Presentation title: New York City's Accelerating Overdose Epidemic: Help Put Data Into Action

This talk will describe trends in the overdose epidemic nationally and in New York City. Michelle Nolan will discuss how the New York City Health Department is responding to the overdose epidemic and provide examples of overdose prevention messaging for people to share with their social networks.


Michelle NolanMichelle L. Nolan is a Senior Epidemiologist at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in the Bureau of Alcohol, Drug Use Prevention, Care and Treatment. In this position, she analyzes real-time data and conducts research to inform and evaluate public health responses aimed at reducing overdose mortality. She holds an MPH in Epidemiology from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and is currently a doctoral student in the Epidemiology Department at Columbia.

CDUHR Visiting Scholar Series – Dustin Duncan – January 28, 2021
Thursday, January 28, 2021, 10:00 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Dustin T. Duncan, ScD
Presentation title: “…I’m afraid of White people”: Anti-Black Racism, Police Violence and the Health and Wellbeing of Black Cisgender Sexual Minority Men

Anti-Black racism and police violence are predominant social problems in the United States disproportionately impacting cisgender Black boys and men. These social problems have been associated with deleterious health outcomes and health behaviors, including among Black boys and men. Intersectionality theory would suggest that Black sexual minority men would be even more salient and harmful in this vulnerable population. This talk aims to: 1) provide a background on health iniquities, social iniquities and structural racism, 2) provide an overview of police violence and current-related issues, and 3) discuss health research on police violence among Black sexual minority men. The talk will showcase current and future studies Dr. Duncan is involved in, including work with Dr. Maria Khan’s research team (Grant Number: 5R01DA044037) as well as from one of Dr. Duncan’s prospective cohort studies: N2 (Neighborhoods and Networks) Cohort Study, which includes 600 HIV-negative and HIV-positive Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men in Chicago IL, Jackson MS, and New Orleans and Baton Rouge LA (Grant Numbers: R01MH112406 and U01PS005122).


Dustin DuncanDustin T. Duncan, ScD (he/him) is a social and spatial epidemiologist, studying how neighborhood characteristics influence population health and health disparities. Dr. Duncan’s intersectional research focuses on Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men (SMM) and transgender women of color. His research has a strong domestic focus–including in New York City and the Deep South–and his recent work spans the globe such as in West Africa, especially with Columbia’s International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP). In addition to HIV epidemiology and sleep epidemiology, his current interests include characterizing the COVID-19 epidemic in the United States and globally, especially among marginalized populations. Notably, his group recently completed the N2 COVID Study, where they surveyed 226 Black SMM and Black transgender women in Chicago on various aspects of COVID-19 from April to July 2020. Methodologically, his research utilizes a geospatial lens to apply advanced geographic information systems, web-based and real-time geospatial technologies, and geospatial modeling techniques. Working in collaborations with scholars across the world, he has over 175 high-impact scientific articles, book chapters, and books and his research has appeared in major media outlets including U.S. News & World Report, The Washington Post, The New York Times and CNN. Dr. Duncan’s work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the HIV Prevention Trials Network, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Verizon Foundation, and the Aetna Foundation. He currently leads two NIH-funded R01 studies, as well as studies funded by other sources, and mentors K and other awards of junior scientists. He has received several early career and distinguished scientific contribution awards including from the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS). In 2020, he received the Mentor of the Year Award from Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

CDUHR Visiting Scholar Series – Dustin Duncan – January 21, 2021
Thursday, January 21, 2021, 10:00 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Dustin T. Duncan, ScD
Presentation title: Applications of Geospatial Methods to Study Neighborhoods and Population Health and Health Disparities

The field of neighborhoods and health (sometimes referred to as spatial epidemiology) has grown exponentially in the last twenty years, especially since the publication of the first edition of Neighborhoods and Health edited by Ichiro Kawachi and Lisa Berkman in 2003. This talk aims to: 1) provide an historical overview of neighborhoods and health research, 2) examine recent directions in neighborhoods and health research, and 3) touch on methodological areas including the issue of spatial misclassification. The talk will overview applications of geospatial methods to study neighborhoods in population health and health disparities research with examples from Dr. Duncan’s two prospective cohort studies, which use novel geospatial methods.

Dr. Duncan’s next presentation will be on Thursday, January 28, 2021 from 10-11:30 am. The topic will be determined by polling of our audience on January 21st.


Dustin DuncanDustin T. Duncan, ScD (he/him) is a social and spatial epidemiologist, studying how neighborhood characteristics influence population health and health disparities. Dr. Duncan’s intersectional research focuses on Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men (SMM) and transgender women of color. His research has a strong domestic focus–including in New York City and the Deep South–and his recent work spans the globe such as in West Africa, especially with Columbia’s International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs (ICAP). In addition to HIV epidemiology and sleep epidemiology, his current interests include characterizing the COVID-19 epidemic in the United States and globally, especially among marginalized populations. Notably, his group recently completed the N2 COVID Study, where they surveyed 226 Black SMM and Black transgender women in Chicago on various aspects of COVID-19 from April to July 2020. Methodologically, his research utilizes a geospatial lens to apply advanced geographic information systems, web-based and real-time geospatial technologies, and geospatial modeling techniques. Working in collaborations with scholars across the world, he has over 150 high-impact scientific articles, book chapters, and books and his research has appeared in major media outlets including U.S. News & World Report, The Washington Post, The New York Times and CNN. Dr. Duncan’s work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the HIV Prevention Trials Network, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Verizon Foundation, and the Aetna Foundation. He currently leads two NIH-funded R01 studies, as well as studies funded by other sources, and mentors K and other awards of junior scientists. He has received several early career and distinguished scientific contribution awards including from the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS). In 2020, he received the Mentor of the Year Award from Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Don Des Jarlais – January 12, 2021
Tuesday, January 12, 2021, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Don Des Jarlais, PhD
Presentation title: Ending an HIV Epidemic Among PWID in a Middle Income Country

Viet Nam experienced a large HIV epidemic among PWID in the 1990s, with seroprevalence reaching over 50% in some provinces. Since the 2000s, Viet Nam gradually implemented “combined prevention and care for HIV among PWID.” Dr. Des Jarlais will present on four large RDS studies of PWID the DRIVE Study team conducted in the city of Hai Phong, Viet Nam. (N’s of approximately 1500 per annual survey, with cohort studies of approximately 800/year.) HIV incidence was was < 1/1000 person-years and the 90-90-90 treatment goals were achieved for the PWID population. The involvement of drug user community-based organizations was critical to the success.


Des JarlaisFor over 30 years Don Des Jarlais has been conducting HIV/AIDS research among persons who inject drugs (PWID). He is PI of the “Risk Factors” study (R01DA003574), which was instrumental in tracking the HIV/AIDS epidemic in New York City. This study has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse since 1983 and is the longest continuously funded study on HIV/AIDS in persons who use drugs. He has conducted HIV/AIDS research nationally (Seattle, CDC CIDUS studies, national syringe exchange survey) and internationally (in over 20 different countries). He has served as a consultant on these issues to the World Health Organization, the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Vincent Guilamo-Ramos – October 13, 2020
Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Vincent Guilamo-Ramos, PhD, MPH, LCSW, PMHNP, ANP-BC, AAHIVS
Presentation title: Community Engaged Interventions to Address Overlapping Epidemics Among Latinos in the United States

Latinos in the US are impacted by overlapping and intersecting epidemics. National public health efforts to address HIV, HCV, drug use, and more recent infectious disease outbreaks such as COVID-19 have inadequately recognized Latinos as an important disparity population. This omission has inadvertently resulted in the prevention needs of Latino communities remaining largely invisible. The presentation seeks to: 1) characterize HIV, HCV, drug use, and COVID-19 disparities among Latinos in the US; 2) highlight the role of meaningful community engagement for achieving reductions in Latino health disparities; 3) discuss the implications of researchers’ social position relative to community members (i.e., positionality) for research that successfully advances the uptake, adherence, infrastructure, and sustainability of evidence-based programs within Latino communities; and 4) consider these concepts in relation to traditional notions of “scientific rigor.”


Vincent Guilamo-RamosVincent Guilamo-Ramos is a professor and Associate Vice Provost of Mentoring and Outreach Programs at New York University (NYU). He is the director and founder of the Center for Latino Adolescent and Family Health (CLAFH). Dr. Guilamo-Ramos also serves as the Pilot Projects and Mentoring Core Director at CDUHR at the NYU School of Global Public Health. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos is a clinical social worker and nurse practitioner, and is board certified in HIV/AIDS nursing (ACRN) and as a HIV specialist (AAHIVS). Clinically, he has expertise in the primary care of HIV positive adolescents, provision of pre-exposure prophylaxis for high-risk youths, and screening and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos studies the role of families in promoting adolescent health, with a special focus on preventing HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections, unplanned pregnancies, and improving treatment outcomes for HIV positive and at-risk youth. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare. He serves as Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the Latino Commission on AIDS, and is a board member of the Power to Decide. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos received his PhD from SUNY Albany, and his MSW and MPH degrees from NYU. In addition, he holds an MS from the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at NYU and an MSN from the Duke University School of Nursing.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Linda M. Collins – September 8, 2020
Tuesday, September 8, 2020, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Linda M. Collins, PhD
Presentation title: A Brief Introduction to Intervention Optimization

In this presentation Dr. Collins will briefly describe the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST). This is a framework that can be used to optimize behavioral, biobehavioral, biomedical, and social-structural interventions by removing wasteful inactive components and balancing effectiveness against affordability and implementability.


Linda CollinsLinda M. Collins is co-director of the CDUHR Methods Core and Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Biostatistics in the School of Global Public Health, New York University. Her primary research interest is advancement and dissemination of the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST), and applications of MOST to develop interventions that are not only effective, but also efficient, economical, and scalable.