ResearchPublications

Trends in ketamine use, exposures, and seizures in the United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there have been shifts in nonmedical ketamine use, poisonings (“exposures”), and seizures.

METHODS: We used generalized additive models to detect trends in past-year use (2006–2019), exposures (1991–2019), and seizures (2000–2019) involving ketamine in the United States.

RESULTS: There was a quarterly increase in self-reported past-year nonmedical ketamine use in 2006 to 2014 (β  = 0.21; P = .030) and an increase in 2015 to 2019 (β  = 0.29; P = .036), reaching a peak of 0.9% in late 2019. The rate of exposures increased from 1991 through 2019 (β  = 0.87; P = .006), and there was an increase to 1.1 exposures per 1 000 000 population in 2014, with rates remaining stable through 2019. The rate of ketamine seizures increased from 2000 through 2019 (β = 2.27; P < .001), with seizures reaching a peak in 2019 at 3.2 per 1000 seizures.

CONCLUSIONS: Indicators suggest that ketamine use and availability has increased, including before increased medical indications, but nonmedical use is still currently uncommon despite increased acceptance and media coverage.

Full citation:
Palamar JJ, Rutherford C, Keyes KM (2021).
Trends in ketamine use, exposures, and seizures in the United States
American Journal of Public Health [Epub 2021 Oct 7]. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2021.306486.