ResearchPublications

Race-based medical mistrust, HIV-related stigma, and ART adherence in a diverse sample of men who have sex with men with HIV
Abstract

Disparities in antiretroviral treatment (ART) access by race for men who have sex with men (MSM) with HIV persist. We assessed whether race-based medical mistrust and HIV stigma impact ART adherence among MSM with HIV. Longitudinal data were drawn from a RCT of a messaging intervention to promote sexual health among MSM. Regression models tested associations between baseline race-based medical mistrust, HIV stigma, and ART adherence at follow-up. In multivariable models with the overall sample of MSM with HIV (n = 383), baseline medical mistrust was negatively associated with ART adherence 3-months post-baseline. Among participants of color (i.e., Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, or another race; n = 301), HIV stigma was negatively associated with optimal ART adherence 6-months post-baseline. Medical mistrust was longitudinally associated with reduced ART adherence among racially and ethnically diverse MSM with HIV. HIV-related services might prioritize patients reporting medical mistrust for additional supports.

Full citation:
Meyers-Pantele SA, Sullivan P, Mansergh G, Hirshfield S, Stephenson R, Horvath KJ (2022).
Race-based medical mistrust, HIV-related stigma, and ART adherence in a diverse sample of men who have sex with men with HIV
AIDS and Behavior, 26 (5), 1456-1466. doi: 10.1007/s10461-021-03500-9. PMCID: PMC9007843.