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Psychiatric comorbidities among people who inject drugs in Hai Phong, Vietnam: The need for screening and innovative interventions
Abstract

The objective of this study is to describe psychiatric comorbidities, associated factors, and access to psychiatric assessment and care in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) in Hai Phong, Vietnam. Mental health was assessed after 12 months’ follow-up using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire (MINI 5.0.0). PWID medical history, drug use, and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were also collected. Among 188 PWID who participated in the assessment, 48 (25.5%) had at least one psychiatric disorder and 19 (10.1%) had 2 or more psychiatric disorders. The most common current psychiatric disorders were major depressive episode (12.2%) and psychotic disorder (4.8%), reaching 10.1% for the latter when lifetime prevalence was considered. Females were more likely than males to have at least one psychiatric disorder, a major depressive disorder, or an anxiety disorder. Methamphetamine use was associated with an increased risk of presenting a lifetime psychotic syndrome. Problematic alcohol consumption was associated with an increased risk of having at least one psychiatric disorder. Psychiatric comorbidities are frequent among PWID in Vietnam. These results highlight the need for routine assessment and innovative interventions to address mental health needs among PWID. Community-based interventions targeting mental health prevention and care should be strongly supported.

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Full citation:
Pham Minh K, Vallo R, Duong Thi H, Khuat Thi Hai O, Des Jarlais DC, Peries M, Le SM, Rapoud D, Quillet C, Nham Thi TT, Hoang Thi G, Feelemyer J, Vu Hai V, Moles JP, Pham Thu X, Laureillard D, Nagot N, Michel L, DRIVE Study Team (2018).
Psychiatric comorbidities among people who inject drugs in Hai Phong, Vietnam: The need for screening and innovative interventions
BioMed Research International, 2018, 8346195. doi: 10.1155/2018/8346195. PMCID: PMC6193349.